Mormon Dilemma 229

20 April

Adam Created by the gods

Encyclopedia of Mormonism, pg. 15; Latter-day scriptures attest that Adam is a son of God, that his physical body was created by the Gods in their own image and placed in the Garden of Eden (Moses 6:9, 22; Abr. 5:7-11; TPJS, p. 345-53; cf. 2 Ne. 2:14-19).

Genesis 1:26 And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

“Us” in the Hebrew is “elohim” which actually has 3 distinct meanings.  1. The fullness or deity of God (Gen. 1:26).  2. Rulers, kings, princes (Ps. 82:6).  3. Pagan gods (1 Sam. 28:13). 

Mormons call their heavenly father by the name of Elohim.  They do not believe in the Trinity so they can’t believe in the fullness or deity of God.  They can’t believe that their Elohim is the explanation #2.  This leaves the Mormon with only one other option of their Elohim.  Pagan gods.  Their explanation in the Encyclopedia of Mormonism confirms this.

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3 Responses to “Mormon Dilemma 229”

  1. shematwater April 22, 2012 at 5:33 am #

    We believe in a greater fullness of deity than any other Christian denomination in existance. Just because we do not believe in the same nature of deity as you do does not mean we do not believe in the Fullness of Deity.

    Elohim is actually translated as gods, plural. Your three meanings are based on your interpretation of the Bible, and thus have no actually basis in fact.

    In Psalms 82: 6 he was not calling them rulers or kings, but gods. In Genesis 1: 26 it is stating that there were more than one God present.

  2. thegardensofboxwoodmanor April 23, 2012 at 5:52 am #

    Your translation of elohim is NOT the orthdox translation. Pls. Study the correct Hebrew translation.

  3. shematwater April 23, 2012 at 10:23 pm #

    GARDEN

    I have studied it. Maybe not to the same depth, but enough. Actually the understanding that you have, if you rely on scholars, originated with the septugent, or Greek translation. It was in this translation that the use of Judges and angels and other terms appeared as rendering of the term Elohim. Before that time it was either used as a singular noun to refer to the God of Israel, or as a plural to refer to many gods, and not always in a pagan senses. This is part of the reason that many scholars believe that the earlier Jews (from Moses to about Isaiah) were Henotheistic.

    In truth the ancients knew well the plurality of Gods, but when the Septugent was translated the uninspired theologians were offended by the thought, and so rendered all these references as angels or judges.
    Thus, Genesis 35: 7, which the KJV renders “And he built there an altar, and called the place El-beth-el: because there God appeared unto him, when he fled from the face of his brother.” would be more appropriately translated “And he built there an altar, and called the place El-beth-el: because there the gods appeared unto him, when he fled from the face of his brother.”
    Also, Psalms 8: 5, which the KJV has as “For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.” would be more appropriately translated as “For thou hast made him a little lower than the gods, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.”

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